Computing – Key Stage 3

Key-Stage-3 Key-Stage-4 Facilities department-policies classroom-availability


Year 7 Programme of Study

Topic Key Skills Projected Assesment
Date
Using computers safely, effectively & responsibly At the end of this Unit all pupils should be able to:

  • use basic file management techniques to create folders, save, copy, move, rename and delete files and folders and make backup copies of files
  • recognise extensions for common file types such as .doc or .docx, .ppt, .jpg etc
  • keep their files in well organised and appropriately named folders
  • explain what constitutes a “strong” password for an online account
  • describe a code of conduct
  • list some of the dangers and drawbacks of social networking sites
  • list some possible responses to cyberbullying
  • send and reply to emails, send attachments
  • use a search engine to find information

Most pupils will be able to:

  • describe guidelines for keeping their identity secure on the Internet
  • describe what is meant by identity theft and how to minimize the risks of this
  • identify a probable phishing email and deal with it appropriately
  • describe how to minimize the danger of having their computer infected by a virus
  • resize images before attaching to emails
  • explain the advantages and disadvantages of email as a method of communication

Some pupils will be able to:

  • manage a Contacts list efficiently for email
  • use an email signature
  • use the advanced features of a search engine
  • describe why the information they find may not be accurate
W/B 12/12/2016
Understanding computers At the end of this Unit all pupils should be able to:

  • Distinguish between hardware and software
  • Give examples of computer hardware and software
  • Draw a block diagram showing CPU, input, output and storage devices
  • Name different types of permanent storage device
  • Suggest appropriate input and output devices for a simple scenario
  • Explain what RAM and ROM are used for
  • Show how numbers and text can be represented in binary
  • Explain the impact of future technologies

Most pupils will be able to:

  • Perform simple binary arithmetic
  • State strengths and weaknesses of different storage devices
  • Describe briefly how data is stored on a CD

Some pupils will be able to:

  • Identify input and output devices for more complex scenarios
  • Explain how characters are encoded using the ASCII system
  • Use an ASCII reference chart to convert a character into binary and its decimal equivalent 
W/B 13/02/2017
Networks & the internet At the end of this Unit all pupils should be able to:

  • State that the Internet is a wide area network and the world wide web is part of the Internet
  • Define the meaning of the terms “domain name”, http protocol
  • Explain the basic principle of packet switching
  • Give examples of LANs and WANs
  • State three different network topologies
  • Describe what is meant by a client-server network and state some of its advantages
  • State why some transmissions are encrypted, and use a simple algorithm to encrypt and decrypt a message

Most pupils will be able to:

  • Explain the meaning and significance of bandwidth
  • Explain what is meant by buffering and why it is used
  • State the advantages and disadvantages of different network topologies
  • Design a simple network layout
  • Identify some of the extra hardware components used in a LAN
  • Compare the uses of peer-to-peer networks and client-server networks

Some pupils will be able to:

  • Design a network layout for their school, using icons to represent server, hub, switch, router, Internet, workstation, printer
  • Describe the concept of cloud computing and some of the benefits it brings to individuals and organisations
W/B 03/04/2017
Software development
  • Understand, design and refine computational algorithms.
  • Visual programming using selection, iteration & operations on variables.
 Terminally assessed project

Year 8 Programme of Study

Topic Key Skills Projected Assessment
Date
Understanding computers At the end of this Unit all pupils should be able to:

  • Distinguish between hardware and software
  • Give examples of computer hardware and software
  • Draw a block diagram showing CPU, input, output and storage devices
  • Name different types of permanent storage device
  • Suggest appropriate input and output devices for a simple scenario
  • Explain what RAM and ROM are used for
  • Show how numbers and text can be represented in binary
  • Explain the impact of future technologies

Most pupils will be able to:

  • Perform simple binary arithmetic
  • State strengths and weaknesses of different storage devices
  • Describe briefly how data is stored on a CD

Some pupils will be able to:

  • Identify input and output devices for more complex scenarios
  • Explain how characters are encoded using the ASCII system
  • Use an ASCII reference chart to convert a character into binary and its decimal equivalent 
W/B 17/10/2016
Networks & the internet
At the end of this Unit all pupils should be able to:

  • State that the Internet is a wide area network and the world wide web is part of the Internet
  • Define the meaning of the terms “domain name”, http protocol
  • Explain the basic principle of packet switching
  • Give examples of LANs and WANs
  • State three different network topologies
  • Describe what is meant by a client-server network and state some of its advantages
  • State why some transmissions are encrypted, and use a simple algorithm to encrypt and decrypt a message

Most pupils will be able to:

  • Explain the meaning and significance of bandwidth
  • Explain what is meant by buffering and why it is used
  • State the advantages and disadvantages of different network topologies
  • Design a simple network layout
  • Identify some of the extra hardware components used in a LAN
  • Compare the uses of peer-to-peer networks and client-server networks

Some pupils will be able to:

  • Design a network layout for their school, using icons to represent server, hub, switch, router, Internet, workstation, printer
  • Describe the concept of cloud computing and some of the benefits it brings to individuals and organisations
 W/B 12/12/2016
Data Representation At the end of this Unit all students should be able to:

  • Explain why all data needs to be converted to binary before the computer can process it
  • Convert positive denary whole numbers (0-255) into 8-bit binary numbers and vice versa
  • Convert between binary and hexadecimal
  • Explain the use of binary codes to represent characters
  • Understand the term ‘character set’
  • Explain the relationship between the number of bits per character and the number of characters which can be represented
  • Explain the representation of an image as a series of pixels represented in binary
  • Explain how sound can be sampled and stored in digital form
  • Perform a binary shift
  • Explain the need for compression

Most students will be able to:

  • Add two binary integers and explain overflow errors
  • Explain why hexadecimal numbers are used to represent binary data
  • Discuss the effect of colour depth and resolution on the size of an image file
  • Explain how sampling intervals and other considerations affect the size of a sound file
  • Explain the effects of a binary shift
  • Explain the purpose of a check digit
  • Explain the effect of different types of compression

Some students will be able to:

  • Explain how instructions are coded as bit patterns
  • Explain how sampling intervals affect quality of the playback of a sound file
  • Explain how the computer distinguishes between instructions and data
  • Calculate a check digit
 W/B 13/02/2017
Software development At the end of this Unit all pupils should be able to:

  • Run simple Python programs in Interactive and Script mode
  • Write pseudocode to outline the steps in an algorithm prior to coding
  • Write programs using different types of data (e.g. strings and integers)
  • Correctly use different variable types (e.g. integer and floating point), assignment statements, arithmetic operators
  • Distinguish between syntax and logic errors and be able to find and correct both types of error
  • Use relational operators to control the order in which program statements are executed and in what order (if and while statements)
  • Use comments to document their programs and explain how they work
  • Write an error-free, well-documented program involving selection and iteration, but with some help given

Most pupils will be able to:

  • Write an error-free, well-documented program involving selection and iteration
  • Describe how a binary search is carried out
  • Explain the advantages of a binary search over a linear search for an ordered list

Some pupils will be able to:

  • Devise their own algorithms to solve reasonably complex problems, e.g.  a binary search
  • Test and debug their programs, and correct both syntax and logic errors
  • Make allowances in their programs for user input errors, ensuring that the program still runs to a successful conclusion – which may include printing an error message and stopping the run
W/B 03/04/2017
ICT project Pupils will, to varying degrees:

  • Use technology with increasing independence to collect, organise and present data/information in digital content.
  • Show an awareness for the audience & quality/trustworthiness of digital content and using it with an awareness of Copyright law.
  • Use a variety of software to manipulate and present digital content: data and information.
  • Share their experiences of technology in school and beyond the classroom e.g. blogging.
  • Make appropriate improvements to solutions based on feedback received, and can comment on the success of the solution.
Terminally assessed project

Throughout both Key Stages, pupils are taught to:

  • Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems.
  • Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.
  • Use 2 or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions.
  • Understand simple Boolean logic and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers.
  • Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems.
  • Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits.
  • Undertake creative projects that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users.
  • Create, reuse, revise and repurpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability.
  • Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct, and know how to report concerns.

Full National Curriculum course content for Computing is available here.

To help provide high quality lessons, we use resources from pgonline_logo

 

Key Stage 3 pupils are given homework every lesson, as appropriate. See the Department of Computing  Homework Policy for more details.

Note that supervised access to Computing resources is available at these times.

Full homework details (including hwk set/due dates) can be found in your Homework Diary.